Winston Anthony Maurice Acott

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06/02/1940 – 02/04/2020

London / Basingstoke

 

 

Our Dad was a huge character. For those that knew him, you couldn’t help but know his charismatic ways, his passion for darts, his Hawaiian shirts that he believed seemed fitting for any occasion and a huge love for Rock’n’roll, particularly Elvis. So much so he kept his teddy bear hairstyle till the day he died.

 

 

Born in Burma during World War II, he survived an unimaginable journey escaping to India as a small baby being carried on the back of his mother (Frances) for over a thousand miles. Along the way he lost his hearing after contracting Meningitis and also the use of his legs to Polio (which he later miraculously regained whilst living at the British Army base) Around the age of thirteen, he was sent to the UK to Preston boarding school for the deaf where he would have a better chance of life but this meant he had to go solo and leave his mother and father behind whilst they served as a Sergeant and Captain of the British Army. This is where he started his new life until they followed on many years later to reunite in London along with his two sisters. (Margaret and Joanna)

 

 

In London is where he spent half of his younger years. He learnt how to become a Tailor, completed various courses at Queen Elizabeth College in London, and worked as a welder for many years to finally settle down and get married to Margaret where they spent living in Basingstoke bringing up two children, Lisa and Darren.

 

 

With all his struggles he lived life, to say the least. Dad could never resist the opportunity to have a laugh with his friends, he was a such sociable man being involved with both the deaf and hearing community, he was always playing in some darts competition and we had a garage full of trophies to prove it. If there is one thing I will always be inspired by, was his determination to never let his deafness get in the way of who he mixed with.
He was an amazing cook and made the most amazing curries which we will all miss.

 

 

On behalf of your children, Lisa and Darren, your sister Margaret, and ex-wife Margaret (who turned out to be a very good friend) we are so sorry that it ended this way and that we couldn’t give you the proper send-off that you deserved. It wasn’t fair.

 

You are now a grandad of four. Only 8 short weeks after you passed, your first Granddaughter was born and then 6 months after, your son became a Dad for the first time to your third Grandson. We just wish you could have been here to see but we know you’re somewhere looking down on us. You reached a great age of 80 but you were and always will be still young at heart.

 
 

Our dad never got to have a plaque so this is the most beautiful way to pay tribute to remember him by.

Dedicate a tree in the Forest of Memories for a loved one lost because of Covid-19.

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